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Articles On Technology

New Technology News: Command and Conquer Reborn

Once upon a very boring day (yes, I also experience it just like you) I was surfing the net trying to look for something good to read. Good thing that, after almost 3 hours of infinite surfing going to different links and back to home pages, I found a few interesting latest technology gadgets on a website that features cool gadgets of today. So, I decided to come up with my own idea to share new technology news to the rest of you who have not been to this website.
Our favorite RTS on HTML5 as feature on new technology news
If you were born during the 80’s and earlier, you might have spent your childhood playing early RTS (Real Time Strategy) games on our inexpensive, yet beloved consoles. Command and Conquer anyone? We still see this game on our consoles today with improved game plays, excellent displays graphic wise, and better gaming environment.
But we all do remember those days when we boasted and fought against our friends on how we destroyed the enemies camp with our own version of dirty tactics of war. Even though the first C&C was in 2D with a lousy GUI and slow paced (sometimes laggy), we all love it.
But a software and web developer in the name of Aditya Ravi Shankar brings all nostalgia on the loose as he made a clone of our once favorite RTS game to our browsers. He developed the game using HTML5 to improve his coding skills and was supposed to try simple tower defense games. But, without definite reasons he jumped straight to doing RTS games and made it special when he decided to do Command and Conquer.
He finished making the clone in a 16 hour per day work for an entire month, and not to mention a whole week of fever because of the extended work hours. Although the game is still yet to be completed with all the bugs and glitches, Shankar is getting the help that he needs from fellow players who tried the game on their own computers.
On a Facebook reply chain, one avid fan of C&C has made a neat list of different bugs and glitches that need to be worked on for Shankar. But despite of these glitches, the smart innovation of this guy has caught the interest of many people especially to old and die hard fans of Command and Conquer. We could all hope that he fixes everything and all of us can enjoy playing this game again at the convenience of our own desktops.…

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Articles On Technology

The Coming Revolution

There will be a worldwide revolution in your lifetime. It is one that will shake the foundations of society as we know it. In fact, it has, without much notice, already begun. And its name is 3D Printing. What? 3D Printing you say? Ridiculous. Surely you jest. How can something as trivial as printing change my life? And yet it will; dramatically so.
The basics
Through several different technologies 3D printers can print just about anything. Instead of the old printing as you know it, 3D printers can create solid objects from a digital model. These printers can create an object by laying down successive layers of materials – millions of them. The materials are fused with a laser. The printer adds successive layers of material until you have a model of what you are trying to create. The model can be very detailed and precise. But the real revolutionary aspect of this technology is in the hundreds of materials one can use to create. To date, they include plastics, aluminum, titanium steel, food (yes food) and even biological cells.
What we can do now
Companies such as Concord and Boeing are already using 3-D printing to create certain airplane parts. Lockheed developed a similar process to create an airplane wing at substantially less time and cost. Even now industry is printing auto parts (including some near complete cars), furniture, clothing, tools, buildings and much more. A few examples are as follows:
The UK University of Southampton recently designed and printed the SULSA unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). It has a wingspan of two meters and can travel at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour. Others are also printing small UAVs for atmospheric research. Because these planes are printed with embeded electronics and moving parts, designers can create shapes and structures at a fraction of the cost of traditional manufacturing.
Italian inventor Enrico Dini created a 3D printer that uses a magnesium based material to bind sand particles together creating sedimentary stone in a matter of minutes. Nature’s process takes hundreds of years. Stone can easily be molded to specific shapes avoiding the need to cut. Mr. Dini can construct a building four times faster than conventional means at less than half the cost.
3D printing is used to make reverse copies of limbs for prosthetic devices. So if a person suffers the loss of a limb, a near exact copy can be made as a replacement. In fact, 3D printing is used to make many bone replacements including jawbones and hips. The laser imaging process ensures that the replacement part has all the same articulated joints and groves needed for tendons, nerves, and veins.
How about clothes? No problem. 3D printing has recently been used by the fashion industry to create everything from bikini’s to Lady Gaga’s dresses (those are strange). But the point is that nylon can be molded into minuscule threads and shaped in any fashion. Eventually the printing process could customize clothes by using a body scan to create an exact fit for the customer.
Are you hungry? 3-D printing takes foods like chocolate, cheese, ground turkey and celery and makes them into new and exciting shapes. A food printer developed by Cornell University students uses softer foods which can be poured into a print head and then pumped out via syringe to form intricate design. Future prospects for food printing are even better.
The Coming Revolution
Amazing things are happening as we enter the cusp of this coming revolution. Even more exciting revolutionary changes are on the horizon.
If you can print jawbones, hips, and car parts; why stop there? How about food? Food is made up of carbons, fats, and fibers. It can, therefore, be printed. Dutch scientist Dr. Kjeld vanBommel gave a talk at TED detailing processes for printing food that could be customized for specific diets. There will come a time in the not too distant future when one can program a home food printer to print a healthy (or not) diet individually customized for each member of the family, or starving village.
But food is only one small part of the revolution. Researchers at Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute have begun printing blood vessels. They have printed artificial biological molecules that are formed with a laser into the shape of actual capillaries and veins. So the question comes, If you can do capillaries and veins can you print something really cool, like an actual human organ? Well, it looks like the answer will be yes.
Dr. Anthony Atala at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine received worldwide fame when he became the first person to grow a human organ – a bladder – in a laboratory and implant it in a human being. He recently upped the game by printing a …